Trouble With Toast

Recipe: Salmon “Bulgogi” with Bok Choy and Mushrooms | June 23, 2008

Normally, bulgogi is made from thin slices of beef (most often sirloin). I love the flavors of the traditional Korean marinade, but I’m not always in the mood for red meat. So, when I saw a recipe in June’s Bon Apetit magazine that featured salmon instead of beef, I decided to give it a try. I adapted the recipe a bit to fit the equipment I had on hand, but it turned out really well. The salmon was perfectly cooked, and the marinade had amazing flavor. The bok choy could have used a bit more oomph, so next time I think I’ll make extra marinade and then reduce it down for a sauce. I was even able to eat this salmon left over at work the next day–and no one complained, because the aroma was so intoxicating. Enjoy!

  • 2 large garlic cloves, peeled, divided
    1/3 cup chopped green onions
    1/4 cup soy sauce
    1 tablespoon Chinese rice wine or dry Sherry
    1 3/4-inch cube peeled fresh ginger
    2 teaspoons sugar
    1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil
    3/4 teaspoon chili-garlic sauce
    4 6-ounce center-cut skinless salmon fillets
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 large bok choy, cut crosswise into 1/2 inch strips
    4 ounces fresh shiitake mushrooms, stemmed, caps sliced

Blend 1 garlic clove and next 7 ingredients in mini processor. Arrange salmon in 11x7x2-inch glass baking dish. Spoon marinade over. Let marinate 5 minutes.

Preheat oven to 500°F. Roast fish until just opaque in center, about 8-10 minutes. Meanwhile, heat oil in large nonstick skillet over high heat. Add bok choy and mushrooms; using garlic press, press in 1 garlic clove. Stir-fry until mushrooms are tender and bok choy is wilted. Season with salt and pepper.

Divide vegetables among plates. Top with salmon.

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2 Comments »

  1. This looks really good. Think you could use another kind of fish?

    Comment by Lemmonex — June 24, 2008 @ 12:42 am

  2. Thanks! Yes, you could certainly sub out the salmon. But, you’d probably still want to go with a firm-fleshed fish (like halibut or tuna), so the dish doesn’t turn to mush under the substantial marinade and the high heat.

    Comment by bettyjoan — June 24, 2008 @ 9:12 am


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